Alt-Text

HomeConference ScopeSponsorsCommitteeprogramAbstractSpeakersPoster SessionAccommodationsMaps & DirectionsINC9 ImpressionsPast ImpressionsAbout INC
18/12/2018 :: English :: Print Version
You are here: Speakers / 

Erik Jung, iNEMI/Fraunhofer

   
Title:
 
Adressing the more than Moore challenges from within the OEM community
Presenter name: Erik Jung, iNEMI/Fraunhofer
Contact information: erik.jung(at)izm.fraunhofer.de
CV: Click here to find the CV.
   

Abstract:

Recent decades have been dominated by the paradigm „More Moore“, i.e. making sure that next generation semiconductors follow Moores Law for doubling the performance every two years. Recently, with Moores Law adressing only electronic functionalities and therefore not anymore being adequate to the functional requirements of the complex systems implemented in modern products, this paradigm has shifted towards „More than Moore“, i.e. bringing non-electronic functionalities like optics, mechanics, even biology, into such systems.

While this has been a active field of research by universities around the world, only recently vertically integrated companies have adressed this from a manufacturing point of view and even more recently, OEMs start to face this challenge. Especially in the medical industry, the „More than Moore“ concept can be very advantageous, leveraging the 3D integration techniques, the SiP or SoP concepts in a hybrid concept. Thus, especially OEMs fort he medical industry are looking into the challenges ahead w.r.t productio process, quality assurance, test methods and life time predictions. Clearly, active implants are both most active to implement such „More than Moore“ approaches and also most demanding w.r.t. unknown issues that go alongside with the paradigm shift.

The not-for-profit industry organization iNEMI has adressed this urgent industry need by a dedicated program on „Reliability Requirements for Implantable Medical Devices“ and brought together 62 OEM (large and small enterprises) to identify the knowledge gaps perceived in the manufacturing of such „More than Moore“ driven implants. This contribution will highlight areas where „More than Moore“ is taking place in today´s products and where challenges persist to bother OEM manufacturers.

Back to Top 


Theodoros Karapiperis, STOA unit, European Parliament

   
Title: Nanotechnology in Europe: Opportunities and Challenges
Presenter name: Theodoros Karapiperis, STOA unit, European Parliament
Contact information: heodoros.karapiperis(at)europarl.europa.eu

CV: Click here to find the CV.
   

Abstract:

The talk will look at nanotechnology from a policy-making point of view, focusing on opportunities and challenges linked to nanotechnology that European policy-makers will have to tackle in the years to come. Nanotechnology will be seen as a key enabling technology, but also as a comprehensive techno-socio-economic system directly and profoundly impacting many areas of our everyday lives. The potential of nanotechnology to leverage investments and create jobs, and thus contribute to meeting societal challenges in Europe and worldwide, will be demonstrated. The talk will address the relative position of Europe in the world, discussing first the situation concerning public and private investment in nanotechnology R&D in Europe, and then comparing Europe to other global players. It will go on to discuss the need to coordinate investments at European, national and regional level, and accelerate technology development with a view to market deployment. Governance issues will occupy a prominent part of the talk, starting with a review of potential environmental, health and safety risks linked to nanotechnology, and proceeding to consider risk assessment, management and communication, the regulatory response in the face of uncertainty, with an emphasis on the positions and actions of the European Institutions, and marketing strategies.

Back to Top 


Gerhard Kessler, Silicon Saxony

   
Title:

Silicon Europe - Cluster Alliance for European Micro- and Nanoelectronics Industry
Presenter name: Gerhard Kessler, Silicon Saxony
Contact information: gerhard.kessler(at)silicon-saxony.de
CV: Click here to find the CV.
   

Abstract:

Four of the leading European micro- and nanoelectronics regions are joining their research, development and production expertise to form the transnational, research-driven cluster “Silicon Europe – The Leaders for Energy Efficient ICT Electronics”. The cluster partners from Germany, Belgium, France and the Netherlands are linked by a common goal: They aim to secure and expand Europe’s position as the world’s leading center for energy efficient micro- and nanoelectronics and information and communications technology (ICT). In order to reach this goal, Silicon Saxony (Dresden/Germany), DSP Valley (Belgium), Minalogic (Grenoble/France) and High Tech NL (Eindhoven/Netherlands) are cooperating in research, development and business expertise. Together they represent about 800 research institutes and companies, which account for more than 150,000 jobs; among the companies are global market leaders such as Philips, NXP, Globalfoundries, Infineon, STMicroelectronics, Schneider Electric und Thales. This makes Silicon Europe one of the largest technology clusters of the world.

Back to Top 


Teruo Kishi, NIMS

   
Title: Opening Address Japan
Presenter name: Teruo Kishi, NIMS
Contact information: nims.advisor(at)nims.go.jp
CV: Click here to find the CV.
   

Abstract:

4 years have passed since the global nanotechnology research and education complex (Tsukuba Innovation Arena for nanotechnology :TIA-nano) was established in Tsukuba City, and more than 75% of planned budgets have been spent for the investment. We realized that now is the right time, when we must create a common value toward global business.

As the progress, TIA-nano started many new research projects including EUV lithography research by EIDEC (EUVL Infrastructure Development Center) and Green sensor-net research by the development partnership of NMEMS and new partnership programs including MEMS foundry for small volume (MNOIC) and sample supply of Carbon Nanotube to explore novel applications. In the nano-electronics field, the non-volatile device of the resistance change model that can be applied on the wiring layer of the LSI (Back-End Of Line :BEOL) has been developed. Moreover, BEOL (Back-End Of Line) non-volatile, resistivity-change device and the basic integration technologies were developed including nano-carbon interconnects and variation-free MOS transistor/ platform enabling operation at 0.4V or below with reduced power dissipation for IT equipments.

TIA-nano, as the "global" nanotechnology complex, is implementing the activities to function as an innovation engine of the World.

Back to Top 


Gerhard Klimeck, Purdue

   
Short course title: Short Course on nanoHUB
Presenter name: Gerhard Klimeck, Purdue
Contact information: gekco(at)purdue.edu
CV: Click here to find the CV.
   

Abstract:

If you had access to interactive modeling and simulation tools that run in any browser, could you introduce interactive learning into your classes? If you had easy access tools, which need no installation, could you use them to help guide your experiments? If you did not have to worry about compute cycles, would you benchmark your own tools against other state-of-the-art approaches? If you had your own tools and could easily share them with the community, would you do it?
This short course will provide an overview of these processes and their impact as they are supported on nanoHUB.org today. If you have never been on nanoHUB.org, learn how it might help you; if you have used it, learn about new and upcoming features and share your story with the nanoHUB team and other participants. 

Back to Top 


Alexander Kurz, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

  
Title:Opening Address, May 14, 2013
Presenter name:Alexander Kurz, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
Contact information:alexander.kurz(at)zv.fraunhofer.de
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Back to Top 


Hubert Lakner, Fraunhofer

  
Title:Chair
Presenter name:Hubert Lakner, Fraunhofer
Contact information:hubert.lakner(at)ipms.fraunhofer.de
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Back to Top 


Nikolay Ledentsov, VI Systems

  
Title:Radiophotonics: New Opportunities for International Cooperation
Presenter name:Nikolay Ledentsov, VI Systems
Contact information:nikolay.ledentsov(at)v-i-systems.com
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Research activity in Russia is reviewed in the fields of nanophotonics and nanoelectronics and novel opportunities for international cooperation are discussed. Strong efforts were made in Russia during past years to support research activity in the universities. Moscow State University and StPetersburg State University acquired a special status and the new categories were established: “Federal University” and “National Research University”. Special funding for these universities was provided including grants designed to attract leading scientists to Russian universities. Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) remains an active research body. Two problems are considered to be crucial for future scientific development: innovation activity and international cooperation. Both in different proportions are addressed in the activity of newly formed organizations: ROSNANO and Skolkovo. The former being oriented mainly on innovation based manufacturing while latter including both research and education facilities. A large number of scientists from RAS moved abroad since last two decades. They potentially form a unique basis for international cooperation. In the report we discuss still remaining opportunities in these fields based on direct involvement of institutions of RAS with it's long-term science traditions in photonics and electronics and strong reputation. Project of International Center for Integrated Radiophotonics in LPI is reviewed.

Back to Top 


Paolo Lugli, Univ. of Munich

  
Title:Molecular Electronics
Presenter name:Paolo Lugli, Univ. of. Munich
Contact information:lugli(at)nano.ei.tum.de
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

The talk will present some recent results obtained at the Institute for Nanoelectronics in the field of molecular electronics. On the one side, we used a top-down approach to fabricate devices such as organic LEDs, photodetectors, transistors and sensors. Compared to traditional semiconductor technologies, some of the advantages of using small molecules and polymers as active materials are the low fabrication costs, the large areas capabilities and the possibility to use a variety of different substrates. As example, organic photodetectors based on conductive polymers and chemical sensors based on random carbon nanotube networks will be presented. On the other side, single molecules can be used as electronic devices, e.g. rectifiers and memories, for “beyond Moore” applications. We will present the properties of such molecular nanosystems, a reliable way to contact them and discuss a potential architecture.

Back to Top 


Enrico Macii, ENIAC Italy

  
Title:

Smart Cities and Communities: An Italian Funding Initiative where KETs Serve Societal Challenges
Presenter name:Enrico Macii, ENIAC Italy
Contact information: 
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Back to Top 


Laurent Malier, CEA Leti

  
Title:Minalogic - The Grenoble Cluster
Presenter name:Laurent Malier, CEA Leti
Contact information:laurent.malier(at)cea.fr
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Back to Top 

Andrew Marshall, The University of Texas at Dallas

  
Title:Evaluation of Beyond CMOS Technologies
Presenter name:Andrew Marshall, The University of Texas at Dallas
Contact information:andrew.marshall(at)utdallas.edu
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Nanoelectronics is rapidly approaching an era where the old methods won’t work. For 14nm silicon, and maybe for 10nm, we look certain to use silicon finfet devices as the industry standard approach to ultradense logic. For those technologies the old evaluation and benchmarking standards are OK, but various groups have been working on replacements for conventional CMOS. The most advanced of these include graphene devices, tunnel fets and spin-wave devices. Some of the beyond CMOS devices are not charge based, so new techniques are needed to verify that these devices will perform as expected, when incorporated into VLSI circuits. Work has begun to create a consistent methodology for benchmarking beyond CMOS devices from a logic perspective, but this is also needed for analog, memory and RF applications. We here discuss benchmarking efforts in this area.

Back to Top 


Karlheinz Meier, Heidelberg University

  
Title:The Human Brain Project – Relevance for Nanoscience
Presenter name:Karlheinz Meier, Heidelberg University
Contact information:meierk(at)kip.uni-heidelberg.de
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

The EU has recently awarded research grants to 2 Flagship Projects in Future Emerging Technologies (FET). While the Human Brain Project (HBP) is driven by data collected in neuroscience research, it also has an important component to develop brain derived computing systems. In the future such systems may be based on noisy and imperfect, but very small nano-devices which exploit the computing paradigms of the brain studied in the HBP. The talk will introduce the HBP project objectives and describe the planned research towards brain inspired computing.

Back to Top 


Max Milbredt, GTAI Germany

  
Title:

The Commercialization of Future Technologies in Germany:
Nanotechnology at the Forefront
Presenter name:Max Milbredt, GTAI Germany
Contact information:max.milbredt(at)gtai.com
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Nanotechnology has an increasing influence on the technological performance and international competitiveness of German industries. Almost all industries profit from nanotechnology innovations. Germany sees nanotechnology as a key technology to open the door to the future. It is an important basis for new products, processes and services in several sectors – particularly in the electronics sector which is in fact no more mere “Microelectronics” but should be called more exactly “Nanoelectronics”. Therefore, the German government has set a priority on shaping the future with nanotechnology. The High -Tech-Strategy of the Federal Government focuses on the global challenges climate/energy, health/nutrition, mobility, security and communication, which require future solutions. Under the umbrella of its High-Tech Strategy, the German Federal Government´s “Action Plan Nanotechnology 2015” focuses on research and research funding in order to improve technological performance and enhance the international competitiveness of German science and industry.

Back to Top 


Veena Misra, North Carolina State University

  
Title:

Nanoenabled Self-powered Sensor Systems for Personal
Health and Personal Environmental Monitoring
Presenter name:Veena Misra, North Carolina State University
Contact information:vmisra(at)ncsu.edu
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Recent advances in nanomaterials, nanostructures, and nanodevices have increased efficiency of energy harvesters, lowered energy per computational bit, increased capacitor storage density, and enhanced nanosensor efficiency making a self-powered system finally realizable. Self-powered operation can enable long-term deployment, lower cost, smaller and flexible form factors. These innovative sensing systems can enable long-term sensing and effective management of chronic conditions and improve quality of life outcomes. This talk will focus on how nanotechnology can be used to build miniaturized, self-powered, wearable and wireless sensing systems that can sense personal human physiological parameters and personal environmental exposures and enable direct correlation between personal health and personal environmental exposures. In addition, to achieve true long-term battery-free systems that can enable long-term sensing, it is essential to co-design and co-optimize all the necessary subcomponents of the system. The presentation will discuss nanoenabled solutions for high efficiency piezoelectric and thermoelectric materials, carbon nano structures for high density energy storage, ultra-low voltage tunnel FET devices, ultra-low power nanosensors for physiological and environmental sensing, low power computation and communication and novel heterogeneous integration of these subcomponents into wearable and comfortable platforms.

Back to Top 


Yuji Miyahara, Tokyo Medical and Dental University

  
Title:Detection of Biomolecular Recognition Using Bio-transistors
Presenter name:Yuji Miyahara, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
Contact information:miyahara.bsr(at)tmd.ac.jp
CV:Click here to find the CV.
 

Abstract:

We have been investigating direct interaction between biomolecules and electrons in a substrate. We have developed various types of bio-transistors (Bio-FETs) which are based on direct transduction of charge density change of biomolecules into electrical signal by the field effect. Since DNA molecules are negatively charged in an aqueous solution, hybridization event can be transduced into electrical signal directly without any labeling for target DNA molecules. By combining primer extension reaction with this detection scheme, DNA sequencing could be successfully demonstrated.

We also propose an oocyte-based field effect transistor for drug transport analysis, in which target transporters are expressed at the cell membrane of the oocyte. Non-invasive monitoring of the uptake kinetics of substrates mediated by membrane-bound transporters, and discrimination of transporting ability among genotypes of the transporters can be realized with oocyte-based FET.

A label free, potentiometric method to detect cell surface sialic acid (SA) using phenylboronic acid (PBA) compound integrated into the form of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) has been developed using an extended gold gate field effect transistor. The technique was applied to analyses of altered SA expressions on rabbit erythrocyte as a model for diabetes. The comparative analyses revealed that the disease could be feasibly diagnosed simply by placing the cell suspensions onto the device without any labelling and enzymatic procedures.

Back to Top 



News:

Find here the INC10 flyer.



Find here the INC9 presentations.


Find here some impressions of INC9 in Berlin.