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16/08/2017 :: English :: Print Version
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Jouni Ahopelto, VTT

  
Title:Benchmarking Beyond CMOS Devices
Presenter name:Jouni Ahopelto, VTT
Contact information:jouni.ahopelto(at)vtt.fi
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Scaling of CMOS circuits to follow the Moore´s law is becoming more and more challenging. This has evoked activities to identify and investigate the so called Beyond CMOS devices which can, in the first place, enhance the performance of the current ICs and in the long run provide new paradigms for data processing. The goal of the NANO-TEC project was to identify and benchmark the existing candidates and provide recommendations for the future activities within the European Research Area. The benchmarking took palace in a series of four workshops, first for identification of the technologies, the second for benchmarking, the third for SWOT analysis and the fourth for summarising the recommendations. The workshops included talks by internationally recognised experts and panel discussions to define the potential, maturity and timeline of the new technologies. Several potential candidates were identified, including molecular electronics, MEMS/NEMS, solid-state quantum computing, spintronics, nanowires, memristive devices or neuromorphic computation and graphene. These represent different levels in device performance, integrability and manufacturing, the common issue being the lack of solutions for architecture and lack of appropriate design tools. In this presentation we will describe the methodology of NANO-TEC project, the main results and recommendations.

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Haruo Akahoshi, HITACHI

  
Title:Green Innovation by Nanotechnology
Presenter name:Haruo Akahoshi, Hitachi
Contact information:haruo.akahoshi.rv(at)hitachi.com
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

The importance of nanotechnology is still increasing to realize sustainable society, with solving the environmental issues; prevention of global warming, conservation of resources, and preservation of ecosystems. More than ten years has been passed from 2000 when importance of the nanotechnology had been recognized. The interest of people is moving from “capability of nanotechnology” to “the fruits of nanotechnology”. NBCI; “nanotechnology business creation initiative”, had provided the roadmap of nanotechnology business creation as an early stage activity. Now, we move to next step activity, “visualization” of the fruits of nanotechnology in the society. In Japan, research projects of “atom & molecular science and technology” had been performed since early 1990s. From 2001 to 2010, nanotechnology had been selected as one of four priority fields in the 2nd and 3rd Science and Technology Basic Plan. As a result, practical applications of nanotechnology have been advanced to solve the problems on energy and environment. The latest highlights will be reviewed.

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Dirk Beernaert, EC

  
Title:Reinforcing the competitiveness of Europe in Micro- and Nano-electronics
Presenter name:Dirk Beernaert, EC
Contact information:dirk.beernaert(at)ec.europa.eu
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Micro- and nano-electronic components and systems are essential to digital products and services and underpin innovation and competitiveness of all major economic sectors. This is why micro- and nano-electronics are Key Enabling Technologies (KET) and why Europe must stay at the leading edge in the design and manufacturing of these technologies and related products; providing benefits across the economy and across society, creating growth and jobs in the European Union. This presentation will, after a broad introduction, elaborate on an industrial policy and a European strategy to strengthen the investments and the competitiveness of the micro- and nano-electronics industry in Europe. Research, development and innovation in the context of Horizon 2020, the new framework for European Research, as well as access to skills, to capital and relevant legislation issues will be addressed.

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Ulrich Buller, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

  
  
Title:Opening Address Europe, May 15, 2013
Name:Ulrich Buller, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
Contact information:ulrich.buller(at)zv.fraunhofer.de
CV:Click here to find the CV.

   

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Martyn Chamberlain, EC

  
Title:European Horizon for Nanophotonics and Photonics
Presenter name:Martyn Chamberlain, EC
Contact information:martyn.chamberlain(at)ec.europa.eu
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

The presentation will outline the European Commission's research and innovation strategy for photonics and nanophotonics describing how it is inputting into preparations for Horizon 2020. The main vehicle to support the strategy is establishing a photonics Public Private Partnership (PPP) to secure Europe's industrial leadership and economic growth in photonics enabling a long-term investment commitment by both industry and the European Commission. The goal of the PPP is to maintain Europe's leading position in a number of market sectors where the European photonics/nanophotonics industry is particularly strong and to exploit new emerging market opportunities. It shall also provide more effective successful solutions for the major societal challenges facing Europe, in particular in healthcare & energy efficiency. The photonics PPP shall address and strengthen the full innovation and value chain in photonics/nanophotonics, from materials through equipment and devices to manufacturing and products and services. It will create open access R&D and pilot production platforms, and provide access to photonics technology and services to SMEs. It will enhance synergies between EU-photonics initiatives and regional photonics strategies by strengthening support to cross-collaboration between Photonics Innovation Clusters and with their respective regional industry and public authorities (smart specialisation).

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Gilbert Declerck, IMEC

  
Name:Gilbert Declerck, IMEC
Contact information:declerck(at)imec.be
CV:Click here to find the CV.

   

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Heinz Martin Esser, Silicon Saxony

  
Title:

Silicon Saxony e.V. – Europe‘s most successful regional High-Tech Cluster
Presenter name:Heinz Martin Esser, Silicon Saxony
Contact information:heinz-martin.esser(at)roth-rau.com
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

In his presentation Heinz Martin Esser will introduce Europe’s largest Cluster in the ICT (Information & Communication –Technology) and will explain the impressing development with the main factors of success. Another Highlight of his speech describes the efforts to build up a strong European Cooperation beginning initially with a partnership with Grenoble (Minalogic) which could currently be extended with other important European High – Tech Clusters (founding of Silicon Europe) to establish a new mutual European Identity in the global competition.

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Claudia Felser, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

  
Title:

Materials Design Impact on the Collaboration between Germany
and Japan
Presenter name:Claudia Felser, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft
Contact information:claudia.felser(at)cpfs.mpg.de
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

The aim of the Japanese-German Research Unit “Advanced spintronic materials and transportphenomena (ASPIMATT)” was and continous to further develop the foundations for a future spintronics. Key is to use the spin degree of freedom as carrier of information. In the recent years spintronics has become a wide research field addressed worldwide. First outcomes, such as magnetic sensors, developed by Parkin from IBM based on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR, Nobel Prize 2007 for Grünberg and Fert) and the tunneling magnetoresistance effect (TMR) have revolutionized the hard-disc industries; novel developments such as spin-transfer torque random access memory (STT-MRAM) are currently aiming at the market.

Key to this field is the development of largely improved magnetic materials and their tailoring to spintronic applications, and this is the central focus of the ASPIMATT research unit. The groups collaborating in ASPIMATT have recognized the need for new materials, and they have opened the new field of the material class of Heusler compounds for spintronic applications. Major contributions to spintronics from the ASPIMATT team have been the invention of the halfmetallicity in Co2-Heusler compounds and the first prove of a magneto-resistance effect in Co2(Cr,Fe)Al, Co2FeSi, a half metallic ferromagnet with a high Curie temperature, development of tetragonal Heusler compounds for spin-transfer torque applications, nowadays used by many other groups as well as industry, high-quality devices for current-perpendicular-plane (CPP) GMR applications with record magneto-resistive parameters, especially for the next-generation read heads in hard disk.

The presentation will give an overview over the activities of ASPIMATT and the impact of Heusler compounds for spintronics.

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Koichi Fukuda, AIST

  
Title:

HyENEXSS: Computing Device Design and Characterization Platform for Nanoelectronics
Presenter name:Koichi Fukuda, AIST
Contact information:fukuda.koichi(at)aist.go.jp
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Introduce some modeling perspectives for developing nano-scale devices in AIST. One is the modeling of metrology which enables the enhancement of physical measurement of nanoscale devices. Modeling of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) enables nano-scale measurements of potential and carrier distributions in the cross section of semiconductor devices. Modeling of Raman spectroscopy allows mechanical stress distribution measurements of complex semiconductor structures. Another aspect is the compact modeling, which is important to clarify basic issues of new generation devices in circuits. As an example, a modeling process of tunnel FETs, starting from TCAD modeling and aggregated into a compact model is explained. Such a modeling process is especially effective if it is performed in parallel with the realistic device development and measurements. Physical insights implemented into a compact model are valid not only to determine guidelines for the device development, but also to consider circuit issues and application targets in the early stages of the development. Such modeling activities are not secondary tools of nano-device projects, but are mainstay important activities in such projects. Therefore we believe that the physical modeling tools are the key infrastructure of Tsukuba Innovation Arena (TIA) projects.

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Mart Graef, TU Delft

  
Title:Nanoelectronics in Europe – the Landscape and the Roadmap
Presenter name:Mart Graef, TU Delft
Contact information:m.w.m.graef(at)tudelft.nl
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

Over the last twenty years, the semiconductor landscape has changed fundamentally. In the nineties, the world of integrated circuits was dominated by a limited number of large companies, competing for leadership in DRAMs, microprocessors and logic devices, driven by Moore’s Law, engaged in the quest for the highest integration density and the largest wafer size. Today, this domain , which used to be monolithic and digital, has been invaded by new paradigms, such as multifunctionality and heterogeneous integration, a trend that is loosely described by the term “More than Moore”. The combination of nanoelectronics with other disciplines will enable new application possibilities in areas with a high societal and economic impact, such as healthcare (e.g. minimally invasive surgery, organ-on-a-chip). As these developments require a synergy between very different fields of expertise, they can only be sustained by a close collaboration between industries, institutes and universities. In Europe, several initiatives were taken to explore the associated technical challenges and the opportunities for cooperation. A “More than Moore” roadmapping methodology was developed by the European section of the ITRS International Roadmapping Committee. Support actions such as NANO-TEC have generated recommendations for the technology-design ecosystem for nanoelectronics, which are utilized by initiatives such as ENI2 for the development of a European infrastructure for nanoelectronics. Successful exploitation has to be ensured by the creation of integrated pilot lines for the transfer of research results to the manufacturing environment.

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David Holden, CEA Leti

  
Title:Minalogic - The Grenoble Cluster
Presenter name:David Holden, CEA Leti
Contact information:david.holden@cea.fr
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

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Giuseppe Iannaccone, University of Pisa

  
Title:Graphene Transistors and 2D Electronics
Presenter name:Giuseppe Iannaccone, University of Pisa
Contact information:giuseppe.iannaccone(at)unipi.it
CV:Click here to find the CV.
  

Abstract:

The perspective of graphene-based electronics is one of the main reasons for the explosive growth of interest in graphene in recent years. Graphene has very promising transport and electrostatic properties, but also a serious drawback for electronics: it has no native energy gap, precluding the possibility of shutting off device current. In this talk we discuss the pros and cons of the main options available to induce a gap in graphene or to use alternative two-dimensional materials in order to fabricate high performance transistors that can have chances to bring the semiconductor industry “Beyond CMOS”. We also discuss our recent proposals of lateral heterostructure transistors based on graphene, as an extremely promising option for devices and integrated circuits.

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